Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker: Blog https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog en-us (C) Gene Bowker 2021 genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) Sun, 02 May 2021 22:44:00 GMT Sun, 02 May 2021 22:44:00 GMT https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/img/s/v-12/u547612128-o746292077-50.jpg Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker: Blog https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog 120 120 Welcome Back https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2021/5/welcome-back It's sad when it's May and you just realize you have not made a new blog post yet this year. It's been a busy year with work and we're all still dealing with the COVID-19 world that we now live in.  Luckily I've gotten both of my shots so I'm looking forward to getting back out and making some new images to share with you.  My wife got her first one last week, so soon we'll both be protected.

I'll turn 50 in a week on May 8th, which is still hard to believe in many ways.  However, I'm feeling better these days as I've been able to lose the Covid weight on a Low-Carb diet over the last 8-10 months.  I still have a ways to go to my goal, but I know I can get there.

Next week, my wife and I will be taking our first roadtrip in a long time to drive to Arkansas to visit my Mom, drive plenty of backroads and hopefully make some new images.

I've been working from home since March 2020, but in June we'll be going back to the office at least part-time.  I'm not looking to the traffic hassles again, but it will be nice to get out of the house a couple of days a week and back into somewhat of a "normal" routine.Since I don't have any new images to share with you yet I'll end with one of my favorites.

Talk to you soon!

Steamy MorningSteamy MorningThe Norfolk Southern celebrated their 30th Anniversary in style during 2012 as they brought Nickel Plate 765 and the Southern 630 out onto the NS tracks as goodwill ambassadors.

Early morning in Wiliamson, West Virginia and the 765 is bringing its consist to the depot where NS employees and their families will be treated to a ride over the Pocahontas Division.

Learn more about this piece of living history.

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) Photography Railroad Trains https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2021/5/welcome-back Sun, 02 May 2021 22:43:55 GMT
A tender retirement https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2020/5/a-tender-retirement TendersTenders

A line of steam locomotive tenders parked on a weed covered siding at the Southeastern Railroad Museum here in Duluth, GA

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) Georgia Railroad https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2020/5/a-tender-retirement Sun, 17 May 2020 15:51:03 GMT
River Reflections https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2020/5/river-reflections River ReflectionsRiver Reflections - Augusta Georgia

The old Southern Railway bridge is still used by trains and leads from South Carolina (on the far shore) into downtown Augusta, Georgia. Usually the surface of the river is rippled by boat traffic or wind, but this day it seemed extra "smooth" and ready to be photographed. 

Why Post Process?

When I started in photography and even digital photography I was completely of the school that post-processing was somehow "cheating" or bad.  The idea was to get the perfect "Straight-from-the-camera" shot that accomplished everything you wanted it to.

Later on when I moved to Lightroom; I discovered Silver Efex,  which allows you to create a variety of black & white conversion effects.
 
I use SilverEfex Pro 2 for 90% of my black & white conversions and often use ColorEfex Pro 4 on color shots or to pre-process before moving to silverefex to finish up.
 
I really like how you can control the amount of the effects to best come up with the results you want.  Each image requires a different combination to end up with what you want. You get those options.

I've learned that I get the most enjoyment from photography by post-processing to make them "my own".  Taking a RAW file and tweaking it to come up with an image that "says" what I want it to. Sometimes it is easy, but sometimes it can be a long process. But the end results are worth it to me.

 

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) Augusta Bridge Georgia Post-processing River https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2020/5/river-reflections Sun, 03 May 2020 21:41:30 GMT
Wide World of Railroads https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2020/4/wide-world-of-railroads  

Dark Fog

The Wide World of Railroads is a series I began in early 2012 where I use a 1 to 3 (1:3) crop-ratio to create "faux"-pano style shots of railroad scenes.

This shot of the CSX in Folkston was one of the first times that I shared a photo in the ratio.  I like the way that the crop brings the train into the shot as the main actor.  In this case it seems to work so much better than the original image.

As I'm shooting railroad scenes, I use the grid in the viewfinder of my Canon DSLR to try and imagine how the shot will look when cropped.  It requires me to think differently.. because of needing to allow space at the top or bottom (or both) for cropping later on.

Another ratio which is gaining popularity is the 16:9 ratio which is the same that is used on a HDTV. With so many images being seen on HDTV's these days, it is a natural also.

What is your favorite ratio? Have you tried some shots in untraditional ratios?

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) Photography Railroad Trains https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2020/4/wide-world-of-railroads Sat, 18 Apr 2020 13:00:00 GMT
A morning with the Green Dragon https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2020/2/a-morning-with-the-green-dragon I woke up much earlier than I expected this morning and not being able to get back to sleep, decided to get up and make coffee and have my morning bowl of joy, I mean my first pipe. It's a cold morning here in Georgia (well for us) and the smell of coffee quickly filled the room.

Looking through my jar rotation, I found myself drawn to the jar of Green Dragon from The Country Squire like it was calling out to me, sort of like a Ring. I remembered that the Green Dragon is part of the Middle Earth series named after locations in the Lord of the Rings series.

Opening the jar, I saw the combination of darker and lighter Virginias and was greeted by a sweet note similar to fresh cut grass or hay. The cut is ribbon and ready to pack.

My normal morning smokes (on work days) are usually aromatics but this had no topping and its own sweetness. I chose one of my favorite pipes, a Morgan Bones Timberwolf which is based off of the Canadian family. The tall bowl works great with Virginias and particularly with Ribbon cuts.

The smoke followed the same path as the jar note, sweet high notes with a little support in the mid tier. Flipping to the webpage, I was reminded that this is a combination of air-cured (light) and flue-cured (dark) Virginia's according to the blender. It compares quite favorably to Orlik Golden Sliced which is a summertime favorite of mine. The sweetness paired well with the bitterness of the coffee (black as the color of my soul, or something like that)

Finishing the bowl and my first cup of coffee, I was ready to tackle the world.

If you have never tried one of Jon David Cole's blends from The Country Squire you are missing a real treat. Blended in shop from choice tobaccos, you'll quickly understand why the Squire is still going strong in their 50th year.

Timberwolf 2019Timberwolf 2019

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) 2020 Pipe Smoking Review https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2020/2/a-morning-with-the-green-dragon Sat, 01 Feb 2020 13:14:23 GMT
Looking for love in all the wrong places https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2020/1/looking-for-love-in-all-the-wrong-places Looking for loveLooking for loveHe was looking for love in all the WRONG places.

 

He was looking for love in all the WRONG places. 

 

This little guy found his ideal mate I guess in the head of my antenna.  Unfortunately for him, it was a little stiff.

 

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) snapshots https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2020/1/looking-for-love-in-all-the-wrong-places Mon, 27 Jan 2020 22:30:38 GMT
On the way up. https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2020/1/on-the-way-up shapes and anglesOn the way up

 

I've found that by changing my perspective, I can really see life through a different lens.

In photography, we have a choice of focal lengths which can change the focus from the large (It's a fair) to pulling in details from within that view (the lines and angles of the wheel).  The same is true with our view on our lives in general.  I catch myself so focused on the wide view which can be overwhelming, instead of paying attention to the details. 

2019 was a challenging year in many ways for me.   

Professionally, workload at times was overwhelming.  I like to be in control of situations and with so many projects all hitting at once, I usually felt that I was just trying to fight the fire in front of me instead of being able to come up with a strategy to prevent them in the first place.

Photography wise, I took fewer pictures than ever.  I did have a few enjoyable excursions which reminded me why I enjoy making and sharing images, but too many times I didn't make the effort to stop and take a photo I should have.

Writing became a challenge also.  When I'm on the downside of the Ferris Wheel of Life, it becomes too easy for me to turn inward and start to focus on what doesn't seem to be right instead of keeping the Fair in mind.  This blog languished because I didn't know what to write or how to share what was going on.  The image we want to project to the world versus the reality of life we all face.

Onward to 2020.

I've been seeing the meme started by Dolly Parton showing how we project ourselves in different social media outlets.  Social media sharing tends to be those high points.  We present ourselves on LinkedIn as the professional we are in our day-jobs.  Instagram is about pretty images and snaps of the beautiful.  Facebook (personal pages maybe not commerical ones at least) are the images of the life we want our friends to see.  I don't have Tinder, but that is the lover we see ourselves as I guess and what we are looking to attract.

Looking at my accounts, I know I do this also usually.  I have friends who do open themselves up (at least to a close circle) on Facebook with the challenges and more personal aspects of their life.  As an introvert, that is probably one of the most difficult things for me to do.  Only my wife and my closest circle of friends really know what is going on from day-to-day beyond the Public Persona.  Being me, its hard to think of being that open to others, too much risk and too many memories of how that openness has hurt in the past.

2020 has honestly started off great for me.  I'm making more photographs.  I feel better about myself.  I see that confidence coming across in my professional and personal life in unexpected ways.  I'm also back to writing more and feeling more willing to lower the veil a little from time-to-time about what is happening behind the scenes in the day-to-day life.

I'm enjoying writing my blog again.  It's really a letter from me to the world.  I'm honored that folks take the time to read what I write.  More importantly, I'm writing in my personal journal again and putting on paper those things that I'm not ready or willing to even post here.  I'm feeling more creative and trying to take the chance to make new images when the chance presents.  That creativity flows over into my professional life where I'm finding new ways to attack problems with more decisiveness.

I hope you be along for the upward swing. 

Gene

 

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) 2020 Blog Photography Social Media https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2020/1/on-the-way-up Sat, 25 Jan 2020 17:45:11 GMT
Back in the desert again https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2020/1/back-in-the-desert-again I spent a way too quick weekend in Tuscon and didn't take my regular camera as I didn't expect to have much time for photography.

Thanks to my friend I got to enjoy some of beauty of the Southwest and was reminded why I have always loved the region.

I look forward to visiting again soon and being able to make some more serious pictures next time.


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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) 2020 Arizona desert photography https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2020/1/back-in-the-desert-again Thu, 16 Jan 2020 00:11:05 GMT
The Art of Travel and Luxury Bullseye Flake https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2020/1/the-art-of-travel I spent the first Saturday of 2020 reading The Art of Travel by Alain de Botton on my Kindle while enjoying several bowls of Luxury Bulleye Flake  in several of my favorite pipes throughout the afternoon.

After several days of rain, it was nice to see the sun make an appearance bringing with it cooler temperatures and a crisp breeze.  

The Art of Travel was an interesting read to me.  The author combines his thoughts on travel and relates them to famous travelers of the past.  He writes in an engaging prose which kept me engaged.  I can also relate to his observations on travel which was a bonus. 

The key point that I got from the book was the differences between our imagined world of travel and what we find when we actually engage in it.  The thought of flying off to some exotic location versus the reality of airport parking, TSA lines, crowded or delayed flights and the let down we sometimes get from the reality of the locations we've dreamed about or only experienced through pictures or the writing of others.

We find in the book that this is something that has occurred to travelers for many years.  Some travelers acknowledge the fact in their writings while to others it is avoided and the locale remains dreamy or perfect to their readers.  Today I equated this to the travelblog posts on Instagram where the weather always seems perfect, locations are never crowded and around every corner is another picture.  We don't usually see the less savory parts of the day such as traffic jams, less than ideal hotels or foods that don't match our tastes.  I realize lots of the travelbloggers are sponsored by the hotels or locations they visit and part of their "job" (and future gigs) is to present them in their best light.  That doesn't make it reality though.

de Botton does a great job of giving the entire picture in the essays on his travels.  He discusses how even in the most exotic of locations, we still can be blogged down by thoughts of the work or world we left behind.  I know that happens to me.  Even on vacation, thoughts of work creep in and I think about what will be waiting for me when I return to the office.  When that happens, I have two choices:

  1. Give into that stream of thought and be transported back to my work world.  Instead of sitting on the beach watching the waves, now I'm back in the office in my mind.
  2. Stop.  Acknowledge the thought and then focus on something in the present and start thinking about what I'm seeing or doing or reading.

I'll admit, I've been guilty of the first one quite often in the past and sometimes I can't get it out of my head.  One of my goals (I hate that word) for 2020 is to focus more on the present and enjoy it while I can.  Today, that means reading a good book, enjoying one of my favorite tobaccos and sipping on a nice drink.  Work will still be there Monday morning.

I'll be reading more by the author as I work towards reading 100 books this year and will be sharing reviews of some of them here.

Tobacco Notes:

Luxury Bullseye Flake by Peter Stokkebye is a delightful blend of Virginias and Perique, with a touch of black Cavendish — thinly sliced into neat bullseye coins. 

The coins can either be folded into larger pipes or broken up into a ribbon and smoked in smaller ones.  I prefer to use larger pipes as during the smoke you can taste the different component tobaccos as they burn in succession.  The perique doesn't overwhelm the Virginia and the Cavendish gives just a hint of extra sweetness.  It can be purchased in bulk and I always keep it in my normal rotation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You can read some reviews about it on Tobacco Reviews and see what others have to say about this classic blend.

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) 2020 Art of Travel Book Review Luxury Bullseye Flake Pipes Travel https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2020/1/the-art-of-travel Sat, 04 Jan 2020 20:18:13 GMT
Happy 2020 https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2020/1/happy-2020 Retired Crossing GuardRetired Crossing GuardThis old veteran enjoys retirement in front of the restored depot in Folkston, Georgia as the trains of CSX pass by.

 

I'm looking forward to 2020 being a year of more photography and also more writing.  I'm focusing on getting out more and back into the habit of taking the time to stop and take a picture when I see something interesting.

I'm also looking forward to spending more time writing about my adventures and also other experiences from my day-to-day life.

I hope you will be along for the journey.

 

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) 2020 https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2020/1/happy-2020 Wed, 01 Jan 2020 15:59:06 GMT
Talking Railroads with Jpeg2Raw.com https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2019/3/talking-railroads-with-jpeg2raw-com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I had the chance recently to discuss railroad photography with Mike Howard and Tim Kempere on the popular jpeg2RAW podcast show. 

This was my first "live" interview and I enjoyed sharing my favorite photography subject with them.

Be sure to check out their website and the rest of the great episodes.

Nickel Plate 765 at Matewan, West VirginiaNickel Plate 765 at Matewan, West VirginiaThe Norfolk Southern celebrated their 30th Anniversary in style during 2012 as they brought Nickel Plate 765 onto the NS tracks as a goodwill ambassador.

The 765 is seen passing through the floodwall at Matewan, WV on it's way back to the yard at Williamson in August 2012.

Learn more about this piece of living history.

 

 

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) Photography Railroad Trains https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2019/3/talking-railroads-with-jpeg2raw-com Sun, 03 Mar 2019 17:00:00 GMT
A visit with an old friend https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2016/8/a-visit-with-an-old-friend Norfolk & Western 611

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) Photography Railroad Trains https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2016/8/a-visit-with-an-old-friend Sun, 14 Aug 2016 16:57:42 GMT
Working for a living https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2016/6/working-for-a-living Conagra 101 GainesvilleConagra 101 GainesvilleThe remote control switcher works at Conagra in Gainesville, GA in June 2016

 

The remote control switcher works at Conagra in Gainesville, GA in June 2016.

The sound of the old switcher is in stark contrast to the high-powered road power on the Norfolk Southern behind me.

 

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) 2016 Industrial https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2016/6/working-for-a-living Sat, 11 Jun 2016 16:01:41 GMT
Norfolk & Western 521 https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2016/2/norfolk-western-521 NW 521 DesaturatedNW 521 DesaturatedBehind the photo - The Norfolk & Western 521

I had visited the Virginia Museum of Transportation before, but somehow I had overlooked this locomotive until my most recent visit due to some of the more famous attractions there.

The 521 story.

The GP9 was acquired in 1958 to replace the famous J-Class steam engines . The 521 was the last of the class of 21 purchased from EMD. These locomotives were equipped with steam generators and featured a maroon paint scheme which complimented the Norfolk & Western's passenger fleet.

The 521 now resides at the Virginia Museum of Transportation along with the J-Class 611 which it replaced on the railroad 50 plus years ago.

The museum's website talks about the steam to diesel transition:

The railway lines found that a reduction in the size of the crew was a particularly attractive benefit of diesel versus steam. There was no fire, of course, eliminating the need for a fireman. Fueling stops were much less frequent and crews could travel further. However, they did not realize the benefits right away. The powerful railroad unions fought the elimination of the fireman. They also fought the extension of the 100 mile track regions to the 200 or 300 miles that the railways wanted. It took years to win the changes. Today, the diesels typically have two people in each cab, primarily for safety reasons.(A)

Both of these locomotives are great examples of the N&W in the late 1950s which many consider the "Golden Age of Railroading" in America.

More about the 521:http://vmt.org/Loops-Collections/Diesel-Locomotive-Loop/Diesel-Locomotive-EMD-GP-9-521.html

Sources:
(A)
http://vmt.org/Loops-Collections/Diesel-Locomotive-Loop/Diesel-Locomotive-start.html

Behind the photo - The Norfolk & Western 521

I had visited the Virginia Museum of Transportation before, but somehow I had overlooked this locomotive until my most recent visit due to some of the more famous attractions there.

The 521 story.

The GP9 was acquired in 1958 to replace the famous J-Class steam engines . The 521 was the last of the class of 21 purchased from EMD. These locomotives were equipped with steam generators and featured a maroon paint scheme which complimented the Norfolk & Western's passenger fleet.

The 521 now resides at the Virginia Museum of Transportation along with the J-Class 611 which it replaced on the railroad 50 plus years ago.

The museum's website talks about the steam to diesel transition:

The railway lines found that a reduction in the size of the crew was a particularly attractive benefit of diesel versus steam. There was no fire, of course, eliminating the need for a fireman. Fueling stops were much less frequent and crews could travel further. However, they did not realize the benefits right away. The powerful railroad unions fought the elimination of the fireman. They also fought the extension of the 100 mile track regions to the 200 or 300 miles that the railways wanted. It took years to win the changes. Today, the diesels typically have two people in each cab, primarily for safety reasons.(A)

Both of these locomotives are great examples of the N&W in the late 1950s which many consider the "Golden Age of Railroading" in America.

More about the 521: http://vmt.org/Loops-Collections/Diesel-Locomotive-Loop/Diesel-Locomotive-EMD-GP-9-521.html

Sources:
(A)
http://vmt.org/Loops-Collections/Diesel-Locomotive-Loop/Diesel-Locomotive-start.html

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2016/2/norfolk-western-521 Sat, 13 Feb 2016 20:51:05 GMT
Happy Veterans Day https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2015/11/happy-veterans-day USMC F4 YorktownUSMC F4 Yorktown

This would have been state of the art when my father served during Vietnam in the Navy.  He flew on E-2s as a radar tech and later served in the Naval Reserve until he passed away in 1986.  

Thanks to all who served and are currently serving today.

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2015/11/happy-veterans-day Wed, 11 Nov 2015 15:59:08 GMT
PhotoSquared: Bridge over Chattahoochee https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2015/7/photosquared-bridge-over-chattahoochee Bridge SquareBridge Square

 

Here is a different cropping and black & white conversion of last weekend's image made with the EOS-M3 and 11-22mm lens.

 

I liked this in a square crop format with the log in the lower right pointing towards the bridge in the fog on the opposite bank. 

 

Be sure to check out some of my other square format shots in the PhotoSquared gallery here on the Rusted Rail Images page.

 

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) PhotoSquared https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2015/7/photosquared-bridge-over-chattahoochee Fri, 17 Jul 2015 11:55:43 GMT
Times are a changing... https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2015/6/times-are-a-changing Amtrak Gainesville GAAmtrak Gainesville GAA late Amtrak train passes South through Gainesville, Georgia on June 21st, 2015.

 

Times are a changing...

I officially made the jump from DSLR to mirrorless recently. I'm moving from the Canon 5D3 to the EOS-M3 (not released in the US, but purchased from a Japanese dealer).

My main reasons for finally making the jump were:

1) I've found the mirrorless system works better for my current shooting style/time. I travel for business a lot and the M3 and the lenses are easy to carry either in carry-on or when driving.
2) The EOS-M3 can use my remaining EF lenses with the adapter. I did sell my 70-200 f/2.8L as it was overkill with the smaller camera.
3) The EOS-M3 can use the new electronic viewfinder (which I purchased) which eliminates the shooting with my arms in front of me (which I hated)
4) When I went on vacation recently, I decided to leave the 5D3 at home because of the weight and the fact that I was shooting with the G1x and original M 99% of the time.

It is taking some time for me to get used to the new system but I had a fun morning taking some train shots today and I'm really enjoying the compactness and capability of the new system.

Here's a shot from this morning... edited in my normal style.

 

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) 2015 Gainesville Georgia https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2015/6/times-are-a-changing Mon, 22 Jun 2015 00:35:10 GMT
Farm Wood https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2015/6/farm-wood Farm WoodFarm WoodWooden details

I always enjoy taking photos of wood.  The grain is different on every piece of wood I find.

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) Wood https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2015/6/farm-wood Wed, 10 Jun 2015 23:31:13 GMT
Back to our roots https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2014/12/back-to-our-roots Sometimes, we need to return to our roots I think.

When I purchased my first DSLR, a Canon xTi, I decided to take it over to Augusta, Georgia to shoot along the Riverwalk and try it out. The Savannah River was quite calm that morning and there was no boat traffic.  The old Southern Railway bridge was reflected in the water. The only thing that would have improved it, a steam train going across.

River ReflectionsRiver ReflectionsThe ex-Southern Railway bridge is reflected in the still waters of the Savannah River at Augusta, Georgia.

The bridge is located at the Riverwalk Park in downtown Augusta and still serves the trains of the Norfolk Southern.

When I lived in Aiken, this was a favorite place to visit and photograph. I believe this was the only time I visited over several years when the water was this calm.

The only thing that might of made the image even a little more appealing to me would of been a train crossing the classic iron structure.

Years later, this shot is still one of my all-time favorites.  I was never able to duplicate that scene on numerous visits to the location while living in South Carolina.

The image was made as a jpeg.  I didn't know about RAW at the time and was converted to BW in the Canon software provided.  I wish I had a RAW file to process now as I think I could bring out some more details in the shadows, etc...

As we quickly approach the end of 2014, it is time to start thinking about 2015 and our goals as photographers. I'm hoping to do a better job than I did this year of getting out and shooting something every week.  I wish I could say "everyday" but with my work schedule "every week" seems like an achievable goal.

I also hope to do a better job of posting here on the blog. I look back and see some pretty "dry" periods.  My goal for 2015 will be to do at least one post a week. Hopefully, I'll exceed that.

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) 2014 Georgia Photography Railroad https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2014/12/back-to-our-roots Thu, 11 Dec 2014 14:05:51 GMT
Paradise Lost https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2014/10/paradise-lost Paradise 301Paradise 301

 

The old Paradise Restaurant on US 301 in rural Georgia is no longer serving meals to hungry travelers.  Its last use was as a flea market and even that seems to be abandoned now.

With a hole in the roof, who knows how much longer it will be standing before it collapses and the sign will just be sitting next to a concrete slab

This week is another long work trip through South Georgia. 

Hopefully with the great fall weather, I'll be able to capture a few images of cotton fields, pumpkins, and who knows what else along the way.

 

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) 2014 BW Georgia US301 https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2014/10/paradise-lost Mon, 27 Oct 2014 12:21:44 GMT
Big weekend for steam! https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2014/8/big-weekend-for-steam Norfolk Western 1218Norfolk Western 1218

 

Labor Day is a big weekend for steam locomotives in the US.

 

The big news this weekend is the return to steam action of the Tennessee Valley Railroad Museum's 4501 which will be a part of the annual RAILFEST! this weekend in Chattanooga, TN.

I look forward to seeing the 4501 as it returns to the rails as part of the Norfolk Southern's 21st Century Steam program over the next few years, joining the 630, the NKP 765, and hopefully soon the Norfolk & Western 611 undergoing restoration in North Carolina in Spencer.

 

The photo above is of the 611's long-time excursion partner the NW 1218 which resides at the Virginia Museum of Transportation in Roanoke which would also be a great destination this holiday weekend.

 

Wherever you spend the weekend, I hope you have a great end to the Summer, see a bunch of trains, and stay safe near the tracks!

 

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) 1218 4501 611 Day Labor NS NW VMT https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2014/8/big-weekend-for-steam Fri, 29 Aug 2014 00:42:15 GMT
NS 8014 Tifton https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2014/8/ns-8014-tifton NS 8014 TiftonNS 8014 TiftonSnapshot

As a railfan, I might be one of the few people who don't mind being caught by a train at a crossing. The gates were just going down as I pulled up to this crossing in Tifton, Georgia last week, so I rolled down the window and grabbed my trusty
#Canon #G1X to get a snapshot of the passing train.

NS 8014 leads her train through the crossing blowing the horn in the familiar long-long-short-long pattern. A friendly wave from the crew made the moment complete.

 

Snapshot

As a railfan, I might be one of the few people who don't mind being caught by a train at a crossing. The gates were just going down as I pulled up to this crossing in Tifton, Georgia last week, so I rolled down the window and grabbed my trusty #Canon #G1X to get a snapshot of the passing train.

NS 8014 leads her train through the crossing blowing the horn in the familiar long-long-short-long pattern. A friendly wave from the crew made the moment complete.

 

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) 2014 Georgia NS Norfolk Southern Tifton https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2014/8/ns-8014-tifton Sun, 17 Aug 2014 01:59:19 GMT
Dark Fog https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2014/8/dark-fog Dark FogDark FogOn a dark foggy morning in November 2010, CSX 496 leads an empty coal train north from Florida through Folkston, Georgia.

On a morning like this.. you feel the train before you can see it appear slowly from the shadows. You hear the horn blowing for the crossings and feel the ground shake as the engines pass.

Unit coal trains move tons of "black diamonds" from the fields of the Applachians to the Power Plants which provide energy to millions of customers.

 

On a dark foggy morning in November 2010, CSX 496 leads an empty coal train north from Florida through Folkston, Georgia.

On a morning like this.. you feel the train before you can see it appear slowly from the shadows. You hear the horn blowing for the crossings and feel the ground shake as the engines pass.

Unit coal trains move tons of "black diamonds" from the fields of the Applachians to the Power Plants which provide energy to millions of customers.

 

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) CSX Folkston GA Georgia Rail Railroad Rusted https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2014/8/dark-fog Wed, 06 Aug 2014 12:46:56 GMT
The Old Depot https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2014/7/the-old-depot  

The Old Depot

The small depot at Tate, Georgia sits in a state of perpetual decay as it slowly fades into history.

Down and out at the depot

 
The old depot - Tate, GeorgiaThe old depot - Tate, GeorgiaThe small depot at Tate, Georgia sits in a state of perpetual decay as it slowly fades into history.


Once the center of town

The trains don't stop here anymore, the passengers are all gone. No one waits for a loved one to step off the train from the city. No one boards a train bound for war, college, or just a life somewhere else but here.

The depot used to be the center of a community. The agent knew more about the residents of the town and their lives than probably any other person in town, except maybe the bartender.

The agent knew where they were going and where they had been. Which companies were doing well and flush with shipments and which ones were barely holding on. Western Union's telegrams came over the wires with news of births and deaths to be delivered. Deliveries from the mail-order catalogs awaited pick-up, especially around Christmas.


The trains don't stop here any more, the passengers are all gone. No one waits for a love one to step off the train from the city. No one boards a train bound for war, college, or just a life somewhere else but here.

The depot used to be the center of a community. The agent knew more about the residents of the town and their lives than probably any other person in town, except maybe the bartender.

The agent knew where they were going and where they had been. Which companies were doing well and flush with shipments and which ones were barely holding on. Western Union's telegrams came over the wires with news of births and deaths to be delivered. Deliveries from the mail-order catalogs awaited pick-up, especially around Christmas.

The trains stopped running, the agent retired, and no one ever replaced him. The depot sits alone alongside the rusting rails and the paint slowly fades away... so do the memories of days gone by.

Tate is famous for the quality of the marble mined nearby which has been used in monuments and construction throughout the United States.
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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) Americana Georgia Photography Trains https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2014/7/the-old-depot Mon, 28 Jul 2014 12:00:00 GMT
Towards art, my journey https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2014/7/towards-art-my-journey A big challenge for me has been to embrace the idea of becoming more "artistic" in my image making.  
Down at the MillDown at the MillA block away from the mainline, an older GP unit works at the feed mill. The smell of corn fills the air on a humid morning in July 2014.
I was born and raised in the "realism" camp of photography where especially railroad photography was designed to capture the actual moment.  There was not a lot of room for artistic interpretations and photoshop was (still is in many circles) a crime.
In the age of digital cameras and YouTube there are millions of railfans photographing and videoing almost every square inch of rail in the US.   A lot of those images start to look alike, even to a buff to me.

When I go out railfanning these days, I find myself searching for the less obvious, the historical, or the unique.  Something different than the me too shots of the next train, or a special paint scheme.

I believe that we are each capable of creating something "better".  
Taking what we "see" with our camera and making it into something that tells an entire story visually. 

The end result isn't "photography" per se, but more digital art. I've never had any talent with a paint brush or drawing, but I've found a way to express that desire to create.  It is my own way to be an "artist", something I never thought I'd call myself.

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) Americana Art Georgia Photography Railroad Trains https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2014/7/towards-art-my-journey Thu, 17 Jul 2014 12:45:59 GMT
B Still https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2014/1/b-still Still General StoreStill General StoreI almost kept driving on when I passed this store in rural South Carolina back in 2012. I was in a hurry to get home after a long day and from the first glance it was not overly impressive..

However, something caught my attention, so I turned around and came back for a closer look.

B. Still

Walking closer after taking a few wide angle images, I noticed the wasp nest hanging under the island's canopy. Luckily, it appeared that no one was home and I quickly made a few shots of it from different angles.

The store was being covered slowly by Ivy on the front, and the roof was peeling off the top. The windows were gone, but the paint was peeling revealing the brickwork underneath. In short, it had seen much better days.

I'm sure Mr. Still's store was once the gathering place for the surrounding community back before more of the traffic started using Interstate 77 just a few miles to the East.

Farmers probably dropped in to find out what was going on and motorists stopped at the island to fill up on gasoline and maybe check their tires with free air. Probably for years, an attendant did all of that for you before the invention of self-service.

I wonder if the next time I'm up that way if the store will still be there, or if it will have been finally torn down and the lot leveled like so many others. If it is, I'm glad I took the time to photograph B. Still.

I almost kept driving on when I passed this store in rural South Carolina back in 2012.  I was in a hurry to get home after a long day and from the first glance it was not overly impressive.

However, something caught my attention, so I turned around and came back for a closer look.

B. Still

Walking closer after taking a few wide angle images, I noticed the wasp nest hanging under the island's canopy.  Luckily, it appeared that no one was home and I quickly made a few shots of it from different angles.

The store was being covered slowly by Ivy on the front, and the roof was peeling off the top. The windows were gone, but the paint was peeling revealing the brickwork underneath.  In short, it had seen much better days.

I'm sure Mr. Still's store was once the gathering place for the surrounding community back before more of the traffic started using Interstate 77 just a few miles to the East.  Farmers probably dropped in to find out what was going on and motorists stopped at the island to fill up on gasoline and maybe check their tires with free air. Probably for years, an attendant did all of that for you before the invention of self-service.

I wonder if the next time I'm up that way if the store will still be there, or if it will have been finally torn down and the lot leveled like so many others. If it is, I'm glad I took the time to photograph B. Still.

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) Americana Photography South Carolina https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2014/1/b-still Fri, 31 Jan 2014 22:24:29 GMT
Fun Along the Road https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2014/1/fun-along-the-road

Fun along the Road by John Margolies is trip across America to find all of the Quirky "Americana" type places that used to line the highways of the United States before the advent of the Interstate System.

Some of his finds are known nationally such as "Rock City" in Chattanooga, Tennessee; famous for its painted barn advertisements throughout the Southeast.

Others are smaller places, many now closed and demolished, which survived on the drive by traffic on the adjacent highway.

Margolies photographed these locations during years of road-trips which totaled over 100,000 miles.

For example, it is interesting to find out for example how many "Paul Bunyan" giant statues have been erected over the years in many different states.

Margolies wrote many books on similar topics and most of them can be picked up quite inexpensively now on the used book market.

 

 

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) Americana Books Photography Review https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2014/1/fun-along-the-road Sat, 18 Jan 2014 16:33:59 GMT
River Reflections https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2013/8/river-reflections River ReflectionsRiver Reflections

The old Southern Railway bridge is still used by trains and leads from South Carolina (on the far shore) into downtown Augusta, Georgia. Usually the surface of the river is rippled by boat traffic or wind, but this day it seemed extra "smooth" and ready to be photographed.

Why Post Process?


When I started in photography and even digital photography I was completely of the school that post-processing was somehow "cheating" or bad.  The idea was to get the perfect "Straight-from-the-camera" shot that accomplished everything you wanted it to.

Later on when I moved to Lightroom; I discovered Silver Efex, which is now part of  the Nik Collection by Google package, which allows you to create a variety of black & white conversion effects.

I use SilverEfex Pro 2 for 90% of my black & white conversions and often use ColorEfex Pro 4 on color shots or to pre-process before moving to silverefex to finish up.
I really like how you can control the amount of the effects to best come up with the results you want.  Each image requires a different combination to end up with what you want. You get those options.

I've learned that I get the most enjoyment from photography by post-processing to make them "my own".  Taking a RAW file and tweaking it to come up with an image that "says" what I want it to. Sometimes it is easy, but sometimes it can be a long process. But the end results are worth it to me.

 

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) Augusta Bridge Georgia Post-processing River https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2013/8/river-reflections Fri, 16 Aug 2013 13:23:25 GMT
Around and Around https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2013/8/around-and-around shapes and anglesshapes and angles

 

Sometimes we feel life  is just going around and around and we aren't going anywhere

Or... we pay to have that feeling.. just to enjoy the view from the top.


#transportTuesday
 

 

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) Black & White Fair Fairground TransportTuesday https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2013/8/around-and-around Tue, 13 Aug 2013 15:04:29 GMT
Looking for trains or why I am a railfan https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2013/8/looking-for-trains I am looking!

I still find it interesting when I first describe my "railfanning" hobby to others.

The idea that I'll go and spend time looking for trains or taking photographs of them seems "strange" or odd.

Well.. it's just something I enjoy doing.  Why? 

The easiest answer is I like trains.  I have thought they were cool since I was a young kid.  My dad built us an HO-scale model railroad in the garage (we didn't have basements in California, and we used to run them around the plywood with a few buildings and a "Plaster of Paris" mountain in the corner.  I really enjoyed going to Balboa Park to visit the huge model railroad museum there (which still exists http://www.sdmrm.org/ ) and also our trips to Los Angeles on Amtrak.  These days, I enjoy photographing railroads too.  They are never the same and make for interesting subjects.

Also, I like history. When I look at the names on the side of boxcars you can usually see a few from railroads that don't exist any more. Some times they might have merged into a current railroad, but many times they have just been abandoned.  I see those names and it reminds me of their stories.

Finally, I like transportation.  Trains move things. Even when they are empty they are on their way to bring another load.  Be it a hopper full of coal for a power plant, a tankcar full of chemicals, Amtrak train full of passengers, a container load of toys for Christmas, or whatever. Without trains, America would stop.

So while other folks get excited over sports, hunting, running, or whatever; I'll stick with my trains.  See you by the tracks.

 

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) Photo Railroad Trains https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2013/8/looking-for-trains Fri, 02 Aug 2013 16:52:17 GMT
Beat the summer heat https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2013/8/beat-the-summer-heat New Holland Grocery

 

Summer is finally arriving here in the Atlanta area.  While it has been wet and mostly cool so far, we're expecting 5-6 straight days of over 90 degree weather combined with typical humidity.

When I was driving between Aiken and Columbia in South Carolina for work, I'd often take the back roads home which took me through New Holland where Kirkland Grocery stands.

The store is as quaint on the inside and still sold Coca-Cola just like the Button above the hand painted sign proudly proclaims.

As many times as I drove by the store, I only stopped a few times to get a quick picture of this classic.

This one was early on a Sunday morning. (They are always closed on Sunday) 

 

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) Americana Coca-Cola Coke Rural Store https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2013/8/beat-the-summer-heat Thu, 01 Aug 2013 12:58:39 GMT
Still Standing for Now https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2013/7/still-standing-for-now

 

Sometimes when I see old stores along the highways it amazes me that they are still standing at all.

You can see where this store used to have more signs on the front, which were probably removed by the owner or "pickers" over the years, but the Brice sign remains.

This store is tucked off the side of US 321 in rural South Carolina. While the area around it used to be heavily farmed, these days it is mostly chicken and tree "farms" and the population has significantly declined over the decades.

Whenever I see a store boarded up but basically structurally intact, I always wonder if the inside of it is full of "vintage" stock still sitting on the shelves waiting for the next customer who will never come. 

These old stores will not remain forever.

Unless actively preserved the ravages of weather and time will continue to weaken the structures until they finally collapse. That or someone new will buy the land and bulldoze the store down as an eyesore.  

Since I don't get to this area often, I always wonder if it will be there the next time I drive by.  

Just one more reason to take the time to make a photograph "NOW" when you see something, even if the light isn't "perfect" or you are in a "hurry" to get somewhere more photographic.

Hope ya'll have a great weekend and make some new images.

 

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) Americana Country Store South Carolina https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2013/7/still-standing-for-now Fri, 19 Jul 2013 13:04:37 GMT
The Canon G1X : Updated Review https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2013/4/the-canon-g1x  

The Canon G1X is the newest professional level compact camera from Canon. The G1X offers many features normally found on the larger DSLR's in a much smaller package. The G1X however is probably not the best choice for the photography beginner due to its complexity and price point.

I decided to update my review of the G1X to incorporate what I've learned about it over the last 10 months.  This was originally written when I had stepped up from a G12 and before the G15 (which is closer to a G12) was introduced later.

The Canon G1X had an original retail price of $799 placing it closer to the price tags of the entry level DSLRs than to your normal point-and-shoot camera.  Amazon currently is running it for $549 and it has been as low as $499 on sale.  Used models can be picked up usually starting at around $450.

Canon has a great video on their website which describes the G1X in detail and also the mindset of the engineers and designers responsible for it.

Some hand's on observations include:

1) The lens is a lot nicer and it basically replicates a EF 28-115mm dSLR (no you can't change the lens) with full-time (turn-off able) power IS which works in video or still mode.

The CMOS sensor size means the lens is really a 15.1mm to 60.4mm with a 1.9x crop-factor (compared to a 1.6x on the 7D) or a 4.6x on the G12 with it's 6.1mm lens. This is a big improvement.

There is an adapter available to use 58mm standard filters. However, you cannot use the filters and the optional screw on "tulip-style" lenshood at the same time. Later I bought a lenscover that retracts similar to the G12/G15. However, using this precludes using the 58mm filters. A CP filter comes in handy.

2) Max aperature is up to F/22 from F/8 on the G12 due to that bigger lens.

Minimum is a variable F2.8 to 5.8 which makes it the same as a stock lens. I wish they could get the minimum down more, but it is decent in low light.

3) The camera feels "better built" meaning it feels solid. it is not a typical point and shoot that you will be putting in a normal pocket though. It is quite bulky

4) There is a hot shoe and it is compatible Speedlites 270EX and higher. With a 430EX mounted it is very top heavy. However, you can use a ETTL cord for off-camera flash. They also offer a flash bracket to move the flash position to the left of the camera. It does not have full ETTL functionality.

5) The in-camera flash now pops up (from behind the Canon logo) and when it is retracted is off.

6) The ISO dial is gone from the top of the camera (it is now up arrow on the back) and the exposure compensation dial is now under the settings. The exposure compensation dial now goes -3 to 3 and you can immediately see the impact on the LCD.

ISO range is 100-12,100. Auto ISO is adjustable but the max auto is 1600 (I turn mine down to 800 usually). It is not very strong at higher ISO ratings. Of course, I am spoiled to the low light capabilities of the 5D Mark III now. But it is also not a professional level DSLR.

7) It shoots RAW (one of the reasons for getting a G-series in the first place) and you can shoot jpeg+RAW and change aspect ratios on the jpeg shots such as my favorite 1:1 "Photosquared" shots.

8) 14.3MP is nice and allows you to easily crop in on shots and still have good detail.

9) I do not do much video yet, but you can start filming with the push of a button from any mode on the camera instead of having to go to film mode. Built in stereo microphones (and wind filter function) but no way to hook in an external mic (that is a shame)

10) Max exposure time is 1 minute but there is still no "bulb" setting for night-time shooting.

Here is also a link to the full specifications on the G1X

The G1X fits a niche for DSLR owners looking for something smaller to carry with them as a day-to-day or travel camera. While it does not replace the flexibility of the DSLR with their inter-changable lenses and L-series glass, it is a great "back-up" camera and/or everyday camera.

Many of the shots that I share on Google+ and Facebook are taken with the G1X.

Here are a couple of my sample G1X shots:

shapes and angles

 

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) Canon G1X Photography Review https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2013/4/the-canon-g1x Thu, 25 Apr 2013 12:16:45 GMT
Dogging Steinbeck Review - The Hard Truth https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2013/4/dogging-steinbeck-review---the-hard-truth It's not always easy to learn the "truth". Accepting the "truth" can even be harder sometimes. However, when good evidence is given that your belief is wrong, you have to.

I ran across Dogging Steinbeck: How I went in search of John Steinbeck's America, found my own America, and exposed the truth about 'Travels With Charley' by Bill Steigerwald quite by accident when I was searching Amazon for another Steinbeck book.

I read the description from Amazon and decided to give it a read as I am a big Travels with Charley in Search of America and road trip fan from way back.

 

Bill Steigerwald basically decided to recreate the trip from Travels exactly 50 years later in 2010 to discover how America had changed and also to as accurately as possible follow in Steinbeck's tire tracks. If you have read Travel you know that Steinbeck met a cast of characters, and traveled across America in a truck with a camper shell with his French Poodle Charley. I've read the book several times, listened to it on audible, and basically considered it a road-trip classic along the lines of Blue Highways by William Least Heat Moon.

Honestly, what I never really thought about was how accurate a description of the trip was it.  

As Steigerwald mentions, the book has always been sold as "Non-Fiction" so I basically assumed it was telling "the truth".  Of course, I realize in many travel or other non-fiction books things are changed to protect identities, or to even make the story move along better.  This occurs in any book and is accepted.

So how much of Travels is real?

I suggest you pick up a copy of Steigerwald's book and find out for yourself.  The author has done the research (including seeing the first draft of the Travels book in NYC) and then driven the miles in a RAV4 to prove it out. 

I know I'll never look at "Non-Fiction" travel writing the same way again.

Be sure to check out Steigerwald's great blog at http://truthaboutcharley.com/


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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) Book Book Review Road Trip Steinbeck https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2013/4/dogging-steinbeck-review---the-hard-truth Tue, 23 Apr 2013 13:41:38 GMT
Over the top https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2013/3/over-the-top Over the topOver the top

 

Some times we all just go over the top.

 

Look at something today from a new angle. Put that circle (or part of a circle) INSIDE the box of your own creating. 

 

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) BW Fair PhotoSquared https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2013/3/over-the-top Fri, 29 Mar 2013 11:52:56 GMT
Waterwheel Sunrise https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2013/3/waterwheel-sunrise Waterwheel Sunrise

 

The waterwheel served as a power source driven by the movement of water over it. However, the water was controlled to harness the power.

 

What is controlling the water over your wheel?

 

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) color fall mabry mill mill rail rusted rusted rail https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2013/3/waterwheel-sunrise Wed, 20 Mar 2013 11:32:58 GMT
years of fading https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2013/3/years-of-fading Store Detail

 

the sign has seen many coats of paint over its years, but it still does the job quite well.

 

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) fading north carolina rust sign https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2013/3/years-of-fading Sat, 16 Mar 2013 14:35:46 GMT
Happy Birthday Ansel Adams https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2013/2/happy-birthday-ansel-adams Ansel Adams was the first photographer I knew by name. Growing up in California, I fell in love with his images of the great parks and the West.
 

Source: National Archives: http://www.archives.gov/research/ansel-adams/images/aag01.jpg


As I got back into photography, I learned more about the man behind the camera and the true diversity of his career and the images he produced over the years.

I highly recommend that any photographer take the chance to learn more about Adams and his influence on photography through some of the many resources available in print and on-line.

Here are a few places to start:

The National Archives has some of his work which he produced for the US Government:

http://www.archives.gov/research/ansel-adams/

Ansel Adams at 100: San Francisco Museum of Art

http://www.sfmoma.org/explore/multimedia/interactive_features/22

Ansel Adams Books

http://www.anseladamsbooks.com/

 

A few books I recommend include:

Ansel Adams in Color : Proof that he did a lot more than Black & White

Ansel Adams: 400 photographs : A great survey of his career in 400 photos

Examples: The Making of 40 photographs : Learn from Adams himself

 

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) Ansel Adams Photography https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2013/2/happy-birthday-ansel-adams Wed, 20 Feb 2013 17:32:46 GMT
Happy 100th Birthday Grand Central Terminal https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2013/2/happy-100th-birthday-grand-central-terminal The most famous of all United States Railroad stations is celebrating 100 years of service today.

Grand Central Terminal (GCT) in New York City has been serving travelers for a century now.  

Originally owned by the New York Central Railroad, trains such as the 20th Century Limited departed daily from its underground tracks.

The US Post Office did a special Express Mail Stamp to commemorate the occasion. 

A beloved New York City landmark turns one hundred years old in 2013, and the U.S. Postal Service is celebrating with the Grand Central Terminal Express Mail stamp. The train station officially opened on February 2, 1913, and was soon recognized as one of the most majestic public spaces in the world.

The stamp art captures the grandeur of this architectural masterpiece with an illustration of the main concourse. Early morning sunlight streams through the 60-foot-tall windows, illuminating the people below. In the foreground, travelers gather near the round information booth topped with its famous four-sided clock. The concourse's sky ceiling stretches overhead, decorated with a mural of constellations and figures of the Zodiac.

The graphic illustration was created by artist Dan Cosgrove, working with art director Phil Jordan. 

The Grand Central Terminal Express Mail stamp is being issued in self-adhesive sheets of 10 at the $19.95 rate, or $199.50 per sheet.

Grand Central TerminalSo Happy 100th Birthday Grand Central Terminal and here's to another century of servicea

Learn More About Grand Central Terminal

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genebowker@rustedrailimages.com (Rusted Rail Images by Gene Bowker) New York New York Central New York City Railroad Stamp Trains USPS https://photo.rustedrailimages.com/blog/2013/2/happy-100th-birthday-grand-central-terminal Fri, 01 Feb 2013 23:29:43 GMT